EHS “Purples Up” to Honor Military Children

Eisenhower High Schools Military Child Club held a ceremony honoring military families, especially military children, on April 14 in the school auditorium. April was National Military Child Month, which recognizes the sacrifices made by military dependents. The theme for this years celebration was Purple Up, which combined the colors of each branch of the U.S. military.

Ashley Almazan

Eisenhower High School’s Military Child Club held a ceremony honoring military families, especially military children, on April 14 in the school auditorium. April was National Military Child Month, which recognizes the sacrifices made by military dependents. The theme for this year’s celebration was “Purple Up,” which combined the colors of each branch of the U.S. military.

Ashely Almazan, Staff Reporter

     The halls of Eisenhower High School were  decked with purple for the month of April.  The month of April is  National Military Child Month, which celebrates the contributions and sacrifices of military dependents. At Eisenhower high school, the Military Child Club observed this special month by doing its best to bring awareness to the problems that military children face. They decorated the halls purple which reflected this year’s theme for military children. Facts about military dependents were also added to the announcements to update students everyday. The club held a celebration for military children on April 14 in the EHS auditorium to recognize all of the military children who attend Eisenhower High.

     “Purple up for military kids, “Kathleen Garrison the sponsor for the Military Child Club at EHS said, “is a special week for military communities to wear purple to show support and thank military children for their strength and sacrifices. The color purple symbolizes all branches of the military; it is a combination of Army green, Marine red, and Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard blue. Military Kids Week lasts April 18-24.”

     Life for military dependents can be rewarding because of traveling and all of the other wonderful experiences, but it can also be difficult. According to Garrison, most military children will state that moving is one of the biggest hardships and also one of the biggest rewards. Moving takes you away from what is familiar. It can also broaden your horizons by seeing new places, experiencing new things and making new friends. Most military children have been taught diversity because of this.

     At Eisenhower, the Military Child Club offers military dependents a number of services to make their lives easier. According to Garrison, “the club offers a place for both military and non-military children to meet and socialize.  The club interacts with other schools to try and promote establishing clubs in elementary schools.  We also have taken field trips to both the local veteran’s center and the OKC veteran’s hospital.  On these trips we take items that have been purchased and/or donated to distribute to residents.”

     Garrison said this semester the club had 12 active members, and six to eight members were constant in their participation.